A Life Lesson

xNuminousx

Member
IMG_1772.JPG
This subject has come up in the past, about the development team and their hard work. Unlike this picture, we actually do congratulate you for your work. However, the last quote is the point of me posting this. "Always rise above the laughter and criticism. Stay strong." For anyone feeling like their work here is pointless because of some people's opinions, think again. Many people are enjoying your work. You are making many people happy EVERY single day. Focus on the right things.
 
Though in my class, nobody laughs abou that. Some teachers can really be dicks and mock you, so I guess it would be fair to laugh at them back.

Išsiųsta naudojantis SM-G313HN Tapatalk 4 Lt
 

Hero

Member
I really hope you meant to say you didn't notice instead of didn't know because if you actually don't know what 9 * 1 is you got a serious issue.
Of course I meant to say I didn't notice the first one being wrong (although doing anything times 9 is demonic).
 

xNuminousx

Member
"I wrote the first one wrong on purpose, because I wanted you to learn something important."

You obvi didn't finish reading it.
 

Gamzee

God Tier Member
"I wrote the first one wrong on purpose, because I wanted you to learn something important."

You obvi didn't finish reading it.
I did finish reading it. I'm saying it isn't a very good point. Basic multiplication is easy, no one is going to applaud you for doing extremely easy work. If it was Calculus then I'd understand, but without effort or difficulty then you shouldn't expect people to overlook your mistakes.
 
Well, If he wrote complex algebra, most if not all end up confused as it wouldn't be easy, and the actual taught life lesson might go over their heads and pupils will have a doubt that the teacher did actually make a mistake in fact so they might be realizing and trust the teacher did it right flawlessly on the instinct. Not the best way and opportunity to teach the kid's life season that as it easy as the equivalent real example needs to be. Meh, it were geometry about fixing X in a certain triangle shape, I wouldn't probably get it at first reading and would more confused and too focus of figuring "how the heck do you solve that mathematical problem" than be aware of "ah ok, good insight! Thx fam" . My point is, examples with complex mathematics isn't the best way to get the point of "ppl are savages - they will make fun of your stupid actions" across.

Also, I think the lesson was stressing more about being strong and getting back on feet when enduring critique, not upon exclusive when you're being praised. There was no mention upon being congratulated on your work.
 
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xNuminousx

Member
I did finish reading it. I'm saying it isn't a very good point. Basic multiplication is easy, no one is going to applaud you for doing extremely easy work. If it was Calculus then I'd understand, but without effort or difficulty then you shouldn't expect people to overlook your mistakes.
The purpose wasn’t to replicate an exact real world situation by making it reasonable. The purpose was to create a similar situation and show the students how a similar concept can be applied to your everyday life. No one is saying that something as simple as a multiplication error should be ignored until praise is received, it was simply for the purpose of demonstration so his young students could comprehend the message the teacher is trying to get across.

Typically when someone is trying to teach a lesson the instructor will use minor examples of the lesson to bring attention to a larger concept. It’s used all the time in school and this is a perfect example of that. Open your mind a bit.
 
Does anyone remember (If there was such a thing happening) any of your teachers teaching something valuable as that picture?
 

xNuminousx

Member
Does anyone remember (If there was such a thing happening) any of your teachers teaching something valuable as that picture?
Yes. My sophomore English teacher used something as simple as the definition of a chair to convey a greater idea to us. He told the class to formulate a “chair” definition that could only refer to a chair he had in the middle of the class (excluding color and other ridiculous concepts). An example of why this debate lasted for a week was like when a student used “an object with 4 legs with a platform to sit on” as a definition and the teacher pointed to the table they were sitting at and asked: “So is this called a chair then?” And sat on it.

The larger lesson to the simplistic concept of a chair was to think more critically than your used to. He was an amazing teacher and inspired so many in my school.
 
Hmm, trying to recall any, but can't remember but I feel like I was taught something or a few stuff that hasn't stuck in my head.
 

Gamzee

God Tier Member
Well, If he wrote complex algebra, most if not all end up confused as it wouldn't be easy, and the actual taught life lesson might go over their heads and pupils will have a doubt that the teacher did actually make a mistake in fact so they might be realizing and trust the teacher did it right flawlessly on the instinct. Not the best way and opportunity to teach the kid's life season that as it easy as the equivalent real example needs to be. Meh, it were geometry about fixing X in a certain triangle shape, I wouldn't probably get it at first reading and would more confused and too focus of figuring "how the heck do you solve that mathematical problem" than be aware of "ah ok, good insight! Thx fam" . My point is, examples with complex mathematics isn't the best way to get the point of "ppl are savages - they will make fun of your stupid actions" across.

Also, I think the lesson was stressing more about being strong and getting back on feet when enduring critique, not upon exclusive when you're being praised. There was no mention upon being congratulated on your work.
Well first off, this is a just a facebook meme I've seen shared dozens of time, it's totally made up and fake. The analogy is to speak to the reader, not the hypothetical children. Also the picture specifically said the teacher should have been congratulated for doing the basic math right. This doesn't make sense. You shouldn't be expected to be congratulated and rewarded for doing literally the easiest kind of math there is, which really applies to the larger scope of things. If what you do is without any challenge, why should people congratulate you? You should be called out on your mistakes more than your very basics successes, because otherwise you wouldn't be able to grow. Also, the teacher still would've gotten an A if that was an assignment! This analogy attempts to oversimplify a complex idea and really doesn't hold up to any critical scrutiny. Say what you will about the message, the picture does not communicate it effectively.

Let's take another example for the opposite.

Say a person is a firefighter. They've saved countless lives and is a truly honest and good person to everyone, family man, on the village council, pays his taxes on time and well on his way to saving for retirement. One day he drives while under the influence of alcohol and kills a father and daughter in a car crash, should he be exempt from the punishments, even if it was truly a mistake? No, because the weight and severity of both the good deeds and the mistake in question should be called into account and truly considered from a critical prospective. There isn't just a simple phrase or meme that can explain such a nuanced topic.
 

xNuminousx

Member
No where in that meme does it say they should have congratulated the teacher for that error. The point of that picture is not to encourage people to start congratulating people for their accomplishments and less criticism for the wrongs. Your interpretation of the meme is your own, but it’s not the intended interpretation.

It says, “The world will never appreciate the good you do a million times, but will criticize the one wrong thing you do. But don’t get discouraged” Therefor, the purpose is to teach strength. To teach people to not submit to the negativity of others. Stay strong and keep doing what makes you happy.

Your example, however, does not relate to the OP. Yes, they have the same idea is included where a person does many good things and is punished for the wrong. But the fallacy comes into play when the wrong thing they did was a crime. Of course someone should not be exempt from a crime simply cause they’re kind. Everyone should be treated equal in the situation of a crime regardless on your moral character. A persons crime history is what should determine the severity of ones punishment.

Lastly, you’re focusing too much on the history, realism, and purpose of the photo itself rather than the reason I gave for putting it up on the forum in the first place. I describe my reasoning for using that picture here underneath the picture, that is what should he the focus. No matter what the picture actually means or why it may have been used in the past or even why the picture itself is wrong, I still stated MY purpose for using and the message that I wanted people (devs specifically) to get out of it. Arguing about our own interpretation of the picture itself is pointless. I’ll take this no further as I feel I’ve adequately provided my purpose for this thread. Take what you will from it’s meaning but I promise you it has a positive meaning and purpose.
 
The point of that picture is not to encourage people to start congratulating people for their accomplishments and less criticism for the wrongs.
Wanted to convey that, but as I see you worded it better than I could.

Say a person is a firefighter. They've saved countless lives and is a truly honest and good person to everyone, family man, on the village council, pays his taxes on time and well on his way to saving for retirement. One day he drives while under the influence of alcohol and kills a father and daughter in a car crash, should he be exempt from the punishments, even if it was truly a mistake? No, because the weight and severity of both the good deeds and the mistake in question should be called into account and truly considered from a critical prospective. There isn't just a simple phrase or meme that can explain such a nuanced topic.
I don't think the picture had atrocious mistakes in mind, but as minor as something.... lemme think of an example. Basically, something that can be remediable (which doesn't hold true to that "Fireman killed innocent people and shouldn't take punishment" hypothesis, because he cannot undo (restore/resurrect the homicide victims back to life) what horrocious he has done), but something you can work on improving (like a talent, a skill) to achieve your goals without being ashamed of imperfections that people make fun off yours. Let it be that c*nt co-worker or boss that treat you like sh!t and make fun of you when you trying to persuade a ultimate goal such as climbing the top of the career ladder. Being the best football woman player while ignoring the mockery and insults of your coach, teammates that don't believe in her. Etc etc. Got the idea now?
 
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